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The Affective Dimension

Philosophy of History : Twenty-First-Century Perspectives

Bloomsbury Academic, 2021

eBooks

...For some years now theorists and philosophers of history have shown great interest in history’s affective dimension: a concern that is at the centre of Frank Ankersmit’s Sublime Historical Experience (Ankersmit 2005) and has been taken up...

War, Kidnapped Americans and Treason

Peter Rushton

Peter Rushton was Professor of Historical Sociology at the University of Sunderland, UK. He published widely on witchcraft, problems of marriage and family life, the poor law and crime in C18th England. He was the joint author of Eighteenth Century Criminal Transportation (Palgrave, 2004). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Gwenda Morgan

Gwenda Morgan teaches early modern Atlantic history at the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK. She is co-author, with Peter Rushton, of Eighteenth-Century Criminal Transportation: The Formation of the Criminal Atlantic (2003), and Banishment in the Early Atlantic World: Convicts, Rebels and Slaves (2013). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Treason and Rebellion in the British Atlantic, 1685–1800 : Legal Responses to Threatening the State

Bloomsbury Academic, 2020

eBooks

...Despite, or perhaps because of, their failure to secure indictments in the colonies, the British authorities continued to explore the possibility of bringing treasonable offenders to England for trial. As we have seen, the 35 Henry VIII law...

William Herbert Dray

Jonathan Gorman

Jonathan Gorman is Emeritus Professor of Moral Philosophy at Queen's University Belfast and a Member of the Royal Irish Academy, Dublin, Ireland Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Key Thinkers

...Introduction William Herbert Dray, Canadian citizen, was born in Montréal, Quebec Province, Canada, on June 23, 1921. During the Second World War he served as a navigator in the Royal Canadian Air Force and, after the war had ended, he...

After the Revolutions: Sedition, ‘Revolution’, Rebellion and Slavery

Peter Rushton

Peter Rushton was Professor of Historical Sociology at the University of Sunderland, UK. He published widely on witchcraft, problems of marriage and family life, the poor law and crime in C18th England. He was the joint author of Eighteenth Century Criminal Transportation (Palgrave, 2004). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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and

Gwenda Morgan

Gwenda Morgan teaches early modern Atlantic history at the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK. She is co-author, with Peter Rushton, of Eighteenth-Century Criminal Transportation: The Formation of the Criminal Atlantic (2003), and Banishment in the Early Atlantic World: Convicts, Rebels and Slaves (2013). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Treason and Rebellion in the British Atlantic, 1685–1800 : Legal Responses to Threatening the State

Bloomsbury Academic, 2020

eBooks

...There were political trials in the 1790s in England, Scotland and Canada, and colonial conflicts in Grenada, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and Ireland, were followed by similar trials. While the domestic British prosecutions have rightly been...

Loyalism and Patriotism

Peter Rushton

Peter Rushton was Professor of Historical Sociology at the University of Sunderland, UK. He published widely on witchcraft, problems of marriage and family life, the poor law and crime in C18th England. He was the joint author of Eighteenth Century Criminal Transportation (Palgrave, 2004). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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and

Gwenda Morgan

Gwenda Morgan teaches early modern Atlantic history at the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK. She is co-author, with Peter Rushton, of Eighteenth-Century Criminal Transportation: The Formation of the Criminal Atlantic (2003), and Banishment in the Early Atlantic World: Convicts, Rebels and Slaves (2013). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Treason and Rebellion in the British Atlantic, 1685–1800 : Legal Responses to Threatening the State

Bloomsbury Academic, 2020

eBooks

...Problems and interpretations of loyalism Divided loyalties accompany all rebellions, and the American Revolution was no exception. This differed, though, in that the rebels in this instance managed to repress or expel...

The White Man’s World

Dane Kennedy

Dane Kennedy is Elmer Louis Kayser Professor of History and International Affairs at George Washington University and Director of the National History Center, USA. His recent publications include How Empire Shaped Us (with Antoinette Burton, 2016), Decolonization: A Very Short Introduction (2016), and The Last Blank Spaces: Exploring Africa and Australia (2013). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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The Imperial History Wars : Debating the British Empire

Bloomsbury Methuen Drama, 2017

eBooks

...One of the most important developments in British imperial historiography over the past decade or so has been the renewed interest in the so-called white settler colonies. These colonies and their inhabitants have become the subject of two...

Historical Thinking

Lindsay Gibson

Lindsay Gibson is Assistant Professor at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada Peter Seixas Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Peter Seixas

Peter Seixas is Professor Emeritus at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Key Concepts

...Introduction The concept “historical thinking” must be distinguished from “history”; otherwise, “historical thinking” would simply embrace all of historiography, and it would become difficult or impossible to define as a distinct concept...